Pizza night

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Being Cuban and Italian, I grew up around food. I vividly remember baking with my mom and my grandmother cooking all day for a small cantina catering business she ran out of her small apartment. My first job was working the line at a Mexican restaurant and all said, I’ve spent about ten years working in kitchens. Cooking is just something that’s in my blood.

While living in rural Texas for a few years, I found myself with little else to do but watch re-runs of Good Eats and copy what I saw. Produce and meat were cheap, wages low, and with plenty of friends around and few restaurant options in town that weren’t fast food and Denny’s, I cooked at home a lot. That habit nearly a decade ago stuck with me. I regularly cook dinner 3-5 times a week, bake breads, make frittatas from leftover mise for breakfasts during the week, and even rise early on weekends to make a pot of coffee and popovers, or pancakes, or waffles (all from homemade mixes that I’ve honed over years, of course.)

I relish the labor of the kitchen. I look forward to getting home in the evening, blasting some music, and getting lost in the process of making a meal. It’s odd, but in the same way that a lot of creatives spend time away from work to do other creative endeavors, I find myself in the kitchen. Instead of doodling, I work on pickles. Rather than painting I make sourdough starters. And while I could spend evenings going through the mountains of photos that need editing, I spend that time in the backyard brewing beer over a propane turkey fryer.

This weekend, I made pizzas. The dough was a slow ferment that I did for 24 hours in the fridge (though I would have liked at least 48.) The sauce was homemade, the mozzarella was fresh (though not homemade…I have the rennet, but haven’t made my own cheese yet) and the mushrooms and kale sauteed fresh. If a photographer can blog about the sculpting they do, the hell can’t I write about my pizzas?…

Atlanta Eats Live!

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Website and collateral materials for a premier food festival and fundraiser. Designed a a one-page site with sticky header that snaps to the content. Since it takes place at a large outdoor music venue, restaurant module is built to feature “headliners” and “supporting acts” in a system that’s easily editable to reflect frequent additions.

CLIENT:

Atlanta Eats

TYPE:

Website…

Reinventing the Illustrator

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Logo design for the first of a series of panels focused on broadening the horizons of creative professionals. For this event, a panel of seasoned illustrators discussed the things they do to “extend their offerings” such as side projects, working on new styles, or making connections with people in similar fields. Brain illustration by Ed Shems.

CLIENT:

Creative Relay

TYPE:

Logo…

Bread N’ Butter Productions

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Logo design for a video production company that focuses on creating high-quality content for large hotel groups and resorts. Since they’re an Atlanta-based company with a somewhat “homey” name, the design is meant to look old-fashioned and familiar, but crisp and trustworthy. The hand-drawn look stand out in a field of logos with a sharp, technical look.

CLIENT:

Bread N’ Butter Productions

TYPE:

Logo…

Atlanta Eats

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Logo for weekly television show that features a range of restaurants in metro Atlanta. Since they highlight everything from nationally-recognized fine dining restaurants as well as local comfort food cafeterias, the mark had to work both in front of the city’s nicest spots as well as its share of greasy spoons. The slight tilt brings a bit of life to the mark and emphasizes the brand message that “food is fun.” Additionally, the producers wanted the ability license and syndicate in additional markets, so the name area is designed so that other city names could be swapped out without altering the logo’s proportions.

CLIENT:

Atlanta Eats

TYPE:

Logo…

MAKE YOUR LOGO SIMPLE

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MAKE YOUR LOGO SIMPLE

Simple logos are infinitely more effective than Byzantine ones. The most memorable logos in the concern are ever the most simple. Think about it: Nike, Coca-Cola, Target, GM – all of them have minimalist-minded logo designs. I undergo a few good tips that can help you determine if your logo is likewise complex. First, using one color in your design is best. After that, logos get proportionally harder to advert as the sort of colours increases. Never use more than threesome colors. Second, don’ t make it likewise panoramic or likewise tall. Logos should not have to be feature – exclusive seen. If your logo makes the receptor movement to verify it all in, people won’t advert it. Third, omit extra information. Don’t use taglines, rank jural consort obloquy (i.e. Inc, LLC, Corp, etc), sound drawing and the like.

They are distracting and make the most essential information‹your name‹harder to find and remember. Logos, like pictures, can be worth a cardinal words (and feelings), so don’t see like you requirement to vindicate yourself likewise such using words. The way you separate your consort is what will determine how people see about you anyway. Forth, don’t use hornlike to feature fonts. Custom fonts can be cool, especially if no one added duplicates it, but be certain with them for digit reasons: they can be stylish and start out of call quickly, and sometimes a highly stylized type can be harder to read, and thus, forgettable.

Remember, there are hundreds of thousands of logos out there, so stagnant out is important. Perhaps the best way to do that is by making your company’s logo as ultimate and memorable as possible and by using a honored design firm. I propose hunting into LogoWorks for quality logo design.

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Healthy Harvard

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Identity for Harvard University Health Services initiative that serves to improve the well-being of students, faculty and staff. The project is focused not only on physical health, but wellness, work-life balance, and handling stress in a positive manner. Design features the iconic Harvard shield reworked into a sort of “lotus” that has a clean, comfortable, yet dynamic feel to it.

CLIENT:

Harvard University Health Services

TYPE:

Logo…